Reading in the Rockies 2023 – Friday Program


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SPEAKERS SCHOLARSHIPS FRIDAY PROGRAM SATURDAY PROGRAM

 

Friday, September 29th

  • Don’t forget to turn in your badge at the end of the day so you can access your one-day attendance certificate!

Friday, September 29th, 2023 – Day One

(Please note that session times and descriptions may vary slightly from what is posted below. If a session is not listed in the registration process, it has likely sold out already.)


Registration & Buffet Breakfast – 7:00 to 8:00 am

Welcome & Opening Remarks – 8:00 to 8:25 am


Friday Opening Session

8:25 to 9:55 am

Carolyn Strom, Ph.D.

Understanding the Reading Brain: Building Capacity, not Compliance

What do findings from neuroscience mean for word reading instruction? Most importantly, what are the concrete implications for classroom practice? These questions will be at the heart of this session. We will focus on three key design principles of our brain, along with the core cognitive processes involved in learning to read and spell. This talk will explain findings about the reading brain through a scientific story called The Tale of Three Cities, which describes how we construct the reading circuit and build new neural pathways between three different “cities” in the brain. As we gain a more detailed understanding of the reading brain, we will connect scientific principles to both classroom practices and to everyday “kitchen table” routines that can enhance word learning. Participants will leave with actionable insights, frameworks, and strategies to apply in their work with early readers and with teachers of reading.


Break – Visit Exhibitors (Sign up for Raffle Items) & Check out the IDA-RMB Bookstore – 9:55 to 10:15 am


Friday Morning Breakout Sessions

10:15 to 11:45 am – Choose 1 of 7 Possible Sessions


Laura Santerre-Lemmon, Ph.D. University of Denver

Assessment Fundamentals: Understanding Testing & Evaluation of Dyslexia (repeated on Saturday afternoon)

In this presentation, you will learn about the assessment process and characteristics that are important in the evaluation of dyslexia. Dr. Santerre-Lemmon will review school-based and private evaluation processes and discuss common assessment measures and interpretation of test results, including interactive analysis of actual evaluation profiles.


Vicki Piquette, Professor of Reading and Literacy at CSU-Pueblo

Considering EL Students’ Needs at Each Layer of Linguistics

Vicki Piquette will briefly discuss each layer of Linguistics (Phonetics, Phonology, Morphology, Orthography, Pragmatics, Semantics, Syntax, etc.) and then discuss in more length what considerations need to be made for EL students at each of these layers.


Sarah Richards, Reading Interventionist, and Jessica Thurby, Reading Interventionist & Learning Specialist

Embedding Executive Function Skills in the Secondary Classroom (repeated Friday afternoon)

Bright MINDS Dyslexia Support Program teachers, Sarah Richards and Jessica Thurby will share relevant strategies on how to incorporate/embed executive functioning skills into the reading intervention class (as well as larger content classes). Their relatable experiences in the secondary setting set the audience up to understand what executive function skills are and why they are important to incorporate into the daily teaching practice/routine. Participants will come away with greater knowledge and how to in this area as well a sense of empowerment with immediate strategies for implementation.


Laura Colligan, Ed.S., Regional Office and State Organizations Outreach Specialist, Lexia Learning; and Erin Hamilton, Ph.D., Region Office and State Organization Outreach Specialist, Lexia Learning

Ignite Literacy Transformation Through Effective Leadership

Second to teachers, principals have a significant impact on student achievement when serving as effective instructional leaders. Central to that impact is the ability to lead efforts to transform literacy instruction. This session will honor that potential impact while considering how to move educators along the Science of Reading continuum.
Leaders who understand the progression across the continuum will more effectively lead transformation efforts as they support efforts to align literacy instruction to science. Presenters will offer examples of evidence of progress for each phase of the continuum. Additionally, presenters will highlight tools that could help leaders move educators along the continuum.
Throughout the session, participants will reflect on the current state of instruction relative to the Science of Reading continuum. As participants reflect, they will consider specific educators and which of the tools that will be shared would be effective in providing necessary coaching and support. Participants will commit to action by identifying at least one step they will take to apply what they have learned during the session.


Dr. Alfred W. Tatum

Moving Kids with Dyslexia toward Advanced Reading, Writing, and Knowledge Development: A Focus on the Science of Reading and Texts.

This session will focus on reading, writing, and intellectual development as tools of protection to combat the erasure of many elementary students from the social and scientific disciplines. I will highlight approaches (e.g., word study, fluency, comprehension monitoring) to move elementary students to advanced levels of literacy development in a nation in which this focus is taboo in many preK-12 school districts. Instructional, curricular, and assessment practices will be offered along with artifacts from grades 3 – 5. Several resolutions for district leaders, principals, literacy specialists, and teachers will be offered.


Nora Schlesinger, PhD Director of Language and Literacy Education; and Nanci Shepardson, M.S.Ed., Ed.S., W.D.P, CPACC Director of Accessibility and Assistive Technology Solutions

The Role of Executive Function in the Acquisition of Literacy Skills (repeated on Saturday morning)

The acquisition of literacy skills requires multiple executive functioning (EF) skills. Embedding best practices that scaffold and develop EF skills within a structured literacy lesson takes careful and purposeful planning. In this session, participants will understand the term EF and how it applies to literacy education. They will learn the three EF skills that facilitate reading and spelling as well as understand the research around this important topic. Finally, structured literacy teaching methodologies will be explored.


Colleen Zink, M.S.Ed., FIT/OGA, NBCT

Become a Word Wizard through Morphology (repeated on Friday afternoon)

Join this session to discover the magical morphological layer of language. Explore how explicit instruction in Greek & Latin morphemes will improve your students’ spelling, decoding, vocabulary and comprehension. Attendees will walk away with multisensory ideas to deepen student knowledge of morphemes. This session counts towards CEU’s for Orton-Gillingham Academy.


Lunch Buffet – Visit Exhibitors (Sign up for Raffle Items) & Check Out the IDA-RMB Bookstore – 11:45am – 12:45pm


Friday Afternoon – 1st Breakout Sessions

12:45 pm-2:15 pm – Choose 1 of 7 Possible Sessions


Carolyn Strom, Ph.D.

Principles & Practices for Classroom Conversations to Build Word Reading Skills & Belonging

Decades of educational research have established that skilled reading has its roots in spoken language and is also impacted by multiple, contextual variables. But what does this finding mean in practical terms for the classroom? In this session, we will consider highlights from research on instructional conversations (ICs) and explore new ways of facilitating classroom talk and giving corrective feedback so that all students, including multilingual learners, feel empowered to participate and engage in lessons. This session will build on the earlier keynote session, extending the reading brain principles into the practice of classroom discussion.


Lynne Fitzhugh, Ph.D., CALT-QI

The History of English: The Origins and Development of Our Language

The English language we use today is made up of many elements. Phonology, phonics, morphology, and etymology all contribute to our English orthography. What are the origins of our language and how did they evolve into the complex language we have today? This session will help educators deepen their understanding of the etymological and morphological elements of our language in order to help students become more proficient with decoding, spelling and comprehension.


Sarah Richards, Reading Interventionist, and Jessica Thurby, Reading Interventionist & Learning Specialist

Embedding Executive Function Skills in the Secondary Classroom (repeated from Friday morning)

Bright MINDS Dyslexia Support Program teachers, Sarah Richards and Jessica Thurby will share relevant strategies on how to incorporate/embed executive functioning skills into the reading intervention class (as well as larger content classes). Their relatable experiences in the secondary setting set the audience up to understand what executive function skills are and why they are important to incorporate into the daily teaching practice/routine. Participants will come away with greater knowledge and how to in this area as well a sense of empowerment with immediate strategies for implementation.


Paula Kavalec, Manager of Educational Partnerships, M.Ed. Educational Leadership

Accelerating Foundational Skills for Older Readers (repeated Saturday afternoon)

Educators, school leaders, and parents recognize the urgent need to identify and support students in upper elementary, middle, and high school who struggle to read. Foundational reading skills are often at the heart of reading difficulties, and it is crucial to provide instruction that is research-based, respectful, dignified, and age-appropriate to this vulnerable group of students.
In this session, we will unpack research and bridge the research to practice using effective instructional routines within structured literacy lessons. We will also review the essential characteristics of connected texts that engage older readers while also ensuring appropriate practice leading to mastery of critical skills.


Colleen Zink, M.S.Ed., FIT/OGA, NBCT

Become a Word Wizard through Morphology (repeat from Friday morning)

Join this session to discover the magical morphological layer of language. Explore how explicit instruction in Greek & Latin morphemes will improve your students’ spelling, decoding, vocabulary and comprehension. Attendees will walk away with multisensory ideas to deepen student knowledge of morphemes. This session counts towards CEU’s for Orton-Gillingham Academy.


Karen Kemp, Ph.D.

Effective Phonics in Core Reading Instruction (repeated Saturday morning)

“The gulf between science and education has been harmful. A look at the science reveals that the methods commonly used to teach children are inconsistent with basic facts about human cognition and development and so make learning to read more difficult than it should be.” (Seidenberg, M., 2017). Most commercially available reading programs give short shrift to phonic elements and fail to provide adequate decoding instruction for many students in today’s classrooms. This often results in overwhelmed MTSS/RTI systems struggling to meet the needs of the high number of students with deficits in foundational skills. Research shows that reading comprehension is enhanced by vocabulary, background knowledge, and critical thinking. Comprehension also depends on fluency of word recognition. As such, providing explicit phonics instruction in the core can lead to successful decoding and the overall purpose of reading – comprehension.


Melody K. Ilk, M.A.

Part 1: Successful Literacy Systems. What Components Do We Build?

Part 1 – This session will introduce school and district leaders to the research on the systems required to build a successful multi-tiered system of support for literacy. The session will introduce the latest research on sustainability while guiding participants in what needs to be sustained to keep the system healthy and successful over time.


Break – Visit Exhibitors (Sign up for Raffle Items) & Check out the IDA-RMB Bookstore – 2:15 to 2:30 pm


Friday Afternoon – 2nd Breakout Sessions

2:30 pm-4:00 pm – Choose 1 of 6 Possible Sessions


Michael J. Hildebrandt, M.S.Ed., Ph.D.

Emotion and Executive Functioning: Integrating Cognitive and Emotional Strategies (repeated on Saturday morning)

Executive Function impacts all areas of life and learning. In the past, much of the research and practice in executive functioning focused on strategy instruction to support and develop a subset of students’ academic abilities in planning, organization, and working memory, now commonly referred to as cool executive functions. More recent research points out that classrooms are complex social and emotional environments and that students do not remain cool under the daily pressures they face as they engage in rich learning environments and communities. A focus on supporting the emotional aspects of executive functioning is crucial to the development of people of all ages. This presentation will provide context to integrate an appreciation of social and emotional needs within existing strategy instruction in cool executive functions and explore strategies to support warm executive functions such as initiating and maintaining motivation, metacognitive and emotional self-monitoring, emotional and cognitive inhibitory control, and mental flexibility.


Judi Dodson, MA

Teaching Beyond Decodables: Using word recognition and language to build effortless reading and comprehension

This workshop will focus on the benefit of teaching developed and still developing readers, using both word recognition and oral language comprehension. The reciprocity between these two components of reading will support effective instruction that leads to successful comprehension. When we develop language, we give students pegs on which to hang their word recognition skills and when we build word recognition skills, we give students access to the words that will open them to the world of comprehension.
In this session we will go beyond the theory to help you learn how to enhance your literacy lessons by integrating explicit activities that combine language with word recognition even as you teach beginning decodable texts. The more we deepen engagement and connection as we teach foundational skills within the stories our students read, the more we will motivate them to read and engage in the practice that is needed to make reading fun, meaningful, and effortless.


Lindsey Beveridge, Senior Literacy Consultant, Office of Elementary Literacy and School Readiness, Colorado Department of Education; and Mandy Harris, Senior Literacy Consultant, Office of Elementary Literacy and School Readiness, Colorado Department of Education

FULL:Implementing the Science of Reading in the K-3 Classroom (repeated on Saturday afternoon)

In this session, explore how evidence-based instructional practices can be implemented in the 90-minute literacy block and small group instruction to build foundational literacy skills and promote student engagement.


Bridget Barley, Jemicy School Director of Middle School, author of Paragraphology™

The BRIGHT Way to Write (repeated Saturday afternoon)

Paragraphology is the study of writing through color-coding. It is a multisensory, comprehensive, scaffolded approach to writing and note-taking that can be easily utilized by children, teens, college students, and adults. Participants will learn how to support students using a systematically taught formula that guides them through the process of writing a basic paragraph to a comprehensive understanding of the five-paragraph essay. Through scaffolding, repetition, and practice of reading quality examples, producing work of their own, coding and unlocking writing prompts, and dissecting expository text, students learn the writing process inside and out. Participants will leave this presentation and immediately be able to implement Paragraphology in their classes and tutoring sessions.


Lori Welker and Craig Nydick, Denver Enforcement Office Attorneys, US Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights

Ensuring Students with Disabilities a Free Appropriate Public Education

The United States Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights is a law enforcement agency that works to ensure that discrimination on the basis of disability does not happen in public schools. Recipients of Department funds and public agencies are obligated to protect the civil rights of students with disabilities. OCR will discuss students’ right to Free Appropriate Public Education, disability harassment, and transitioning to college.


Melody K. Ilk, M.A.

Part 2: Successful Literacy Systems. How Do We Sustain the Build?

Part 2: This session will examine the importance of in-depth planning to sustain and support the literacy initiative. Participants will utilize a sustainability planning tool with guiding questions. Participants can attend Part 2 without attending Part 1.




Please turn in your name badge after your final session to ensure that you can access the link to our conference survey. After completing the survey, you can download your one-day certificate of attendance.


CLICK HERE for Saturday’s Program


Thank you all for making this a wonderful conference!