Reading in the Rockies 2018 – Saturday Program


Building Your Language, Literacy and Assessment Understandings

ABOUT REGISTRATION SPEAKERS HOTEL INFO
 RAFFLE SCHOLARSHIPS FRIDAY PROGRAM SATURDAY PROGRAM

Saturday, October 13th

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Early Registration Pricing and Payment by Check ends on September 24th!

Hotel booking at Conference Rates is only available until September 27, 2018.

Saturday, October 13, 2018 – Day Two

Registration & Continental Breakfast – 7:00 to 8:00 am

Welcome Address – 8:00 to 8:10 am


Saturday Plenary Session

8:10 to 9:40 am

Charlie Haynes, Ed.D., CCC-SLP, Professor and Clinical Supervisor at the MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, Massachusetts

Keys to Climbing Mount Everest: Word and Sentence Level Strategies for Supporting Narrative and Expository Expression

Indeed, teaching writing skills to students with dyslexia and related language learning difficulties can feel like climbing Mount Everest – this does not need to be the case. Students who grasp how sentences and paragraphs are structured can use this knowledge as they learn to write. Children with language-based learning disabilities do not implicitly form patterns of language structure, nor do they automatically map their knowledge of oral language into its written forms. This practice-oriented presentation provides an overview of strategies for strengthening writing skills at the word, sentence, and micro-discourse levels, as well as paragraph and multi-paragraph levels. In addition, techniques to systematically activate and structure students’ background knowledge concepts will be explored, with particular attention placed on the structured use of thematic vocabulary for developing sentence skills. Together, these word and sentence skills provide a foundation for learners’ success in paragraph-level writing. The methods described are useful for grade school teachers, and TESOL experts, as well as reading/writing specialists working with struggling middle and upper grade school students.


Break – Visit Exhibitors & Bookstore – 9:40 am to 10:00 am


Saturday Morning Breakout Sessions

(Choose 1 of 6) – 10:00 to 11:30 am

Charlie Haynes, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology at the State University of New York, College at Cortland

From Talking to Writing: Hands-on Word & Sentence Strategies

This practical session is a detailed follow-up to Dr. Haynes’s previous keynote session. In-depth theme-centered word- and sentence-level strategies will be the focus. Participants will learn how to guide students through semantic feature analysis of thematic vocabulary, and how to employ basic speech and language techniques for aiding vocabulary retrieval in support of written expression. Attendees will learn how to help students engage in and leverage semantic feature analysis to aid sentence formulation. In addition, participants will learn specific strategies for helping students develop a sense of what a sentence is (and is not) and how to add flair and complexity, while avoiding run-ons and fragments. Methods for aiding sentence expansion and variety will also be addressed. Also, participants will learn how to use sentence combining and artful sentence imitation to enhance depth, clarity, and impact in students’ writing. Simple, manageable ways to assess and then differentiate sentence instruction to support students who struggle and challenge students who excel will be shared. These methods work well supporting typically developing children in grades 1-4, for English Language Learners and for students with language learning difficulties in all grades.


BJ McDonald, M.Ed.; Instructional Specialist at Saint Mary’s Academy; IDA-RMB board member and Morgan Beidleman, M.Ed., M.A.; Private Consultant; Ph.D. candidate at the University of Denver

Teaching the Student Behind the Flying Chair (Repeat of Friday Session)

It is easy to recognize and label students displaying behaviors that are impeding their learning, but those behaviors are only the tip of the iceberg. Determining the underlying emotions and ways to intervene both behaviorally and academically are important. Discover ways to go beneath the iceberg of behavior and better meet the behavioral and learning needs of struggling students.


Daniel Leopold, M.A., Doctoral Student in Clinical Psychology and Neuroscience at CU Boulder

How Educational Assessment and Neuroimaging Inform the Promises & Pitfalls of Brain-Based Interventions (Repeat of Friday Session)

This presentation will address a number of topics related to the therapeutic claims and (in)validity of various brain-based interventions for learning and attention. By first discussing aspects of psychoeducational assessment, clinical diagnosis, and current directions in understanding the reading brain, attendees will be able to more critically evaluate the promises of various approaches to academic intervention.


Cassie Guy, Ed.S., Elementary Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Specialist, Greeley-Evans School District-6

Increasing Academic Discourse in Literacy (Repeated in Afternoon)

Increased academic discourse allows English learners to have supported conversations with native English speaking peers, allowing access to grade-level content in literacy. This session will define academic discourse, and teachers will experience various academic discourse activities that will increase engagement, participation, and conversations between native English speakers and students learning English.


Debbie Campbell, B.A. in Elementary Ed.; M.A. in Curriculum and Instruction; Ph.D. (ABD); Effective Technology For Learning, LLC

SOLD OUT: Assistive Technology Training: What it Looks Like, Why It’s Crucial and How to Do It!

Assistive technology tools are becoming common resources for students with learning and attention issues. It is difficult for educators to keep current with the tools available and how to help students integrate them into class assignments. In this session, you will learn the difference between demonstrating a tool for a student and the nuances of training a student in how to use the tool. You will also learn how to set-up and monitor a trial period with the tool to assess if it is the appropriate tool for the student to continue long-term use.


Elyn S. Moldow, Educational Writer and Former Teacher for Students With Learning Differences

SOLD OUT: Mining for Diamonds through Decodable Texts: Extracting a Wealth of Potential at Every Level (Repeat of Friday Session)

Join me as I share a myriad of practical methods for “mining” decodable texts to facilitate higher-level thinking skills, metacognitive development, and cross-curricular connections. During the session you will learn more about the importance of the reading-meaning connection while gaining tools and strategies for mid-range elementary through early high school students. The text is the mine, the tools are easy to access, and the diamonds will be revealed in your students’ increased skills, motivation, confidence, and joy. You’ll leave this session ready to help your students shine in new and brilliant ways.


Lunch – 11:30 am to 12:30 pm

“Academic Conversations with Colleagues” and the 2018 Raffle Announcements!


Saturday Afternoon Breakout Sessions 1

(Choose 1 of 6) – 12:30 to 2:00 pm


Charlie Haynes, Ed.D., CCC-SLP, Professor and Clinical Supervisor at the MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, Massachusetts

From Talking to Writing: Hands-on Micro-Discourse and Text-Level Strategies

This practical session follows up on latter topics in Dr. Haynes’s morning keynote. Children with language learning difficulties often struggle to carry meaning across sentences and to elaborate on points in their oral and written expression. In this hands-on session, attendees will explore specific “micro-discourse” strategies for building cohesion across groups of sentences and for elaborating narrative and expository discourse. Participants will learn and then apply use of a Cohesion Circle and Detail Circle for building sentences. Strategies for applying these skills to mid- and high- level Personal Sequence Narratives will be illustrated, and then their application to later grade school, middle school and high school paragraph and essay-writing will be illustrated. These methods are applicable to all students, but are particularly useful for English Language Learners and students with language learning difficulties in later grade school, middle school and high school.


Diane Mayer, M.Ed., Fellow In Training/AOGPE, Literacy Specialist/Littleton School District, IDA-RMB Vice President and Nancy Blum, M.A.Ed and M.S.W., Literacy Specialist, IDA-RMB board member

From PAST to Fast!: Phonemic Proficiency as a Core Competency on the Road to Reading Fluency (Repeat of Friday Session)

This session is a “how to” for developing phonemic awareness to the automatic and advanced levels necessary to help students with word level reading difficulties. Participants will get practical ideas for developing phonemic proficiency with students. The work of David Kilpatrick will be referenced, including how to assess using the new PAST test. This session is designed for parents, tutors, and educators who work with students of all ages.


Jodi Champagne, M.Ed., CALT; Kimberly Fitzpatrick, M.A.T., CALT; Janie Harvey, M.A.T., CALT; Jennifer Rowland, M.Ed, CALT-QI

SOLD OUT: NUTS and BOLTS for Building a Strong Literacy Foundation (Repeat of Friday Session)

Teachers who provide literacy instruction must understand the necessary building blocks of skilled reading and how to teach them. In grades K-2, early identification, alphabet knowledge, phonemic awareness, and phonics are essential nuts and bolts in a strong literacy classroom. This session will expand each participant’s toolbox, through explicit instructional methods that effectively serve struggling readers in their formative years. Each rotation considers the needs of Kindergarten-2nd grade teachers and will include strategies that can be implemented Monday morning.


YES! Ambassadors, Sponsored by Learning Ally

From Identification to Self-Advocacy (Repeated in 2nd Afternoon Session)

How do students go from dyslexia identification to self-advocacy? Learn from the best – the YES! Ambassadors. These dyslexic students will take you along on their dyslexic journey and share what it is like to self-advocate in school. The YES! Ambassadors will educate you about dyslexia, how it affects them, and how they learned to accept the identification, self-advocate, and find success in school and life.


Colorado Kids Identified with Dyslexia (COKID)

Parent Power: How Colorado Parent Advocacy Groups are Affecting Change Locally

Join this panel discussion as representatives from various parent advocacy groups across Colorado share what is happening in their districts to support positive change for students with dyslexia. Learn about successful strategies, as well as lessons learned, when working towards incorporating early screening, structured literacy intervention, curriculum changes, and general dyslexia awareness in our schools. Also learn how these groups have joined together to form COKID (Colorado Kids Identified with Dyslexia) to affect change at the state level. There will be time to focus on answering questions from the audience.


Scott DeSimone, Really Great Reading, CEO

SOLD OUT: Erasing the Misery of Reading and Spelling Multi-syllable Words (Repeat of Friday Session)

When students don’t have strategies for reading big words, they often guess, skip or misread words. They struggle to comprehend complex text and often get stuck at reading below level. Attend this workshop and learn how to provide various multi-sensory techniques, such as syllable boards, that are functional, simple and can be applied to reading and spelling long words.


Break – Visit Exhibitors & Bookstore 2:00 to 2:15 pm


Saturday Afternoon – 2nd Breakout Sessions

(Choose 1 of 6) – 2:15 to 3:45 pm


Charlie Haynes, Ed.D., CCC-SLP, Professor and Clinical Supervisor at the MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, Massachusetts

Let’s Catch Kids Early!: Kindergarten Predictors of Grade School Reading and Writing Skills

How can we identify children early, before the period when they are exposed to formal reading instruction? Participants in this practical session will learn research-based strategies for early prediction and prevention of dyslexia and related language learning difficulties, before children fail. There is strong interest in early identification and support for children at risk for dyslexia and related language learning difficulties. Children’s failure with literacy learning in the early grades often results in a downward academic and social-emotional spiral, and illiteracy is extremely expensive for families and for society at large. The good news is that when assessed in preschool and kindergarten, specific cognitive-linguistic abilities can predict with 85-90% accuracy how children will perform in word recognition, spelling, decoding fluency, reading comprehension and decoding fluency in later grades. With early detection and systematic enrichment of key pre-literacy skills prior to formal literacy instruction in Grade 1, we can leverage young children’s neuro-plasticity and help them achieve academic success.


Cassie Guy, Ed.S., Elementary Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Specialist, Greeley-Evans School District-6

Increasing Academic Discourse in Literacy (Repeat of Saturday Morning Session)

Increased academic discourse allows English learners to have supported conversations with native English speaking peers, allowing access to grade-level content in literacy. This session will define academic discourse, and teachers will experience various academic discourse activities that will increase engagement, participation, and conversations between native English speakers and students learning English.


Catherine Deml, M.Ed., Rocky Mountain Reading Literacy Consultant/Tutor; IDA-RMB board member

SOLD OUT: Multisensory Ways to Support Number Sense

Hands-on, make-and-take, multisensory math instruction for all tiers of intervention. Enhance your own understanding of how students develop their knowledge of mathematics from number sense to multiplication facts and beyond. Incorporate individual and classroom activities through concrete, representational, and abstract methodology to support student knowledge and strategy building for problem-solving of mathematics beyond basic fact recall. Includes concepts such as quantity, sequencing, fact families, conceptual place value, and skip counting.


YES! Ambassadors, Sponsored by Learning Ally

From Identification to Self-Advocacy (Repeat of 1st Afternoon Session)

How do students go from dyslexia identification to self-advocacy? Learn from the best – the YES! Ambassadors. These dyslexic students will take you along on their dyslexic journey and what it is like to self-advocate in school. The YES! Ambassadors will educate you about dyslexia, how it affects them, and how they learned to accept the identification, self-advocate, and find success in school and life.


Cindy Kanuch, M.A., CALP, Associate/AOGPE; Title I Reading Interventionist; IDA Certified Dyslexia Practitioner; IDA-RMB board member

What’s Next? A Morphophonological Approach to Structured Word Inquiry (Repeat of Friday Session)

Once the foundational skills of phonics and syllable types have been mastered, students are ready to embark upon a deeper exploration of the morphological structure of our language. Moving away from the Anglo-Saxon layer of our language and into the Latin and Greek layers benefits students not only with their reading and spelling, but with their vocabulary acquisition. In this seminar, participants will learn how to use structured word inquiry to build literacy skills for students in the intermediate elementary grades and above. Participants will explore several engaging methods of word investigation and gain tools and strategies to use in the classroom.


Karen Leopold, MS Ed, Accredited Training Fellow, AOGPE; IDA-RMB Treasurer

Teaching Grammar: To Diagram or Not To Diagram? That is the Question (Repeat of Friday Session)

This session will focus on teaching grammar to middle and high school students. Using appropriate grammar when writing is especially difficulty for dyslexic students. Direct and explicit instruction is crucial. Providing multisensory instruction and practice helps students make the most progress. The ultimate goal of teaching grammar should be to help students understand and use proper grammatical structures when writing.



Please join us after your final session to fill out a brief survey and receive your two-day certificate of attendance.


CLICK HERE to view Friday’s Schedule

Thank you all for making this a wonderful 2018 Conference!