Reading in the Rockies 2019 – Friday Program


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RAFFLE SCHOLARSHIPS FRIDAY PROGRAM SATURDAY PROGRAM

Friday, October 4th

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Friday, October 4, 2019 – Day One

(Please note that sessions may sell out before we are able to update the schedule below. If the session is not available during the registration process, then it is likely sold out.)


Registration & Continental Breakfast – 7:00 to 8:00 am

Welcome & Opening Remarks – 8:00 to 8:20 am


Friday Plenary Session

8:20 to 9:50 am

Marilyn Zecher, M.A., CALT

Creating a Vertical Mindset Using the Superpowers of Math

We may consider literacy instruction as a linear incremental acquisition of skills and structures, but math is more a vertical hierarchy of concepts. It is time for us to begin looking at the foundation skills of math the way we look at the foundation skills of literacy, including the existence of a core deficit which may impact learning. Early recognition and intervention can prevent instructional casualties. At all levels of mathematical learning and reasoning, language plays an essential role. Trace foundation skills from early childhood to algebra as we explore the multisensory world of mathematics and its intersection with language domain.


Break – Visit Exhibitors & Bookstore – 9:50 to 10:15 am


Friday Morning Breakout Sessions

(Choose 1 of 6) – 10:15 am to 11:45 pm


Marilyn Zecher, M.A., CALT

Multiplication and Division: Supporting Students with Dyslexia using VAKT Strategies and Tools from Literacy Instruction

Students with dyslexia frequently need a longer period of time to develop fluency with multiplication facts. Neuroscience may help us understand why, but it is up to the educator to devise strategies before we throw up our hands and resort to exclusive use of accommodations. Multiplication/Division and Fraction concepts are essential for success in secondary math. We do have strategies which can help.


Lucy Hart Paulson, Ed.D., CCC-SLP, Early Literacy Specialist, Author and Consultant

Foundations of Social Emotional Learning Leading to Academic Success (Repeated on Saturday Afternoon)

Social emotional learning is a vital component of academic learning, and both are integrally dependent on foundation executive function and language development. This session describes the interconnected nature of social/emotional, executive function, and communication skill development and ways to create nurturing classrooms that foster social emotional learning as well as academic success.


Jenny Buster Principal, Ed.S., Clayton Elementary; Melody Ilk, M.A., Literacy Consultant,  Literacy Transformations; Becky Jones, M.A. Instructional Coach at Clayton Elementary School

From Philosophy to Science: A School Negotiates the Shift in Literacy Instruction

Improving literacy outcomes for students begins with shifting decades-long beliefs about reading instruction. In this session, educators from Clayton Elementary will share the process they undertook with the support of the Early Literacy Grant to make remarkable improvements in early literacy skills. The team will share important leadership actions that led to the development and implementation of building-wide systems to support the Science of Reading.


Scott DeSimone, Implementation Specialist, Really Great Reading

5 Keys to Helping Adolescents with Decoding Issues, Best Practices and Resources (Repeated on Saturday Afternoon)

Decoding quickly and effortlessly is a basic skill evident in readers who comprehend well. Struggling readers who have gaps in their basic reading skills will likely face frustration and difficulty in multiple subjects. Millions of students in grades 3-12 experience undiagnosed decoding (or word-level) difficulties. These deficits hamper fluent reading and make reading a source of frustration. This presentation will help educators understand the emerging best practices when teaching older students with decoding difficulties.  We will pinpoint resources (many of them free to all educators) that are critical to success.


Cassie Guy, Ed.S. Elementary Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Coordinator, Greeley-Evans School District-6; Jessica Cooney, M.A., Secondary Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Coordinator, Greeley-Evans School District-6

Supporting Students Learning English in the General Education Classroom Through Academic Discourse and Academic Writing (Repeated Friday Afternoon)

Participants will learn techniques to engage students learning English in academic discourse and academic writing while learning grade-level content in a general education setting. This session will provide strategies and scaffolds to help transfer structured academic discourse into academic writing for all grade levels. Through the use of structured academic discourse, academic writing becomes attainable.


Robin Litt, Ph.D., Rocky Mountain Literacy and Child Development; Lauren McGrath, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Denver

How to Interpret Scores on Rapid Automatized Naming: Relationships with Processing Speed (Repeated on Saturday Afternoon)

This presentation will be organized around these three important questions.

  • How should I interpret an individual child’s score on rapid automatized naming (RAN)?
  • Do RAN scores tell you something different than general processing speed scores?
  • How could I use RAN and Processing Speed tests in my overall reading assessment battery?

Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) is known to be an important predictor of reading development, especially reading fluency. There are currently multiple theoretical views on RAN with no single theory dominating the field. One open question is whether RAN relates to reading problems because of generalized speed weaknesses or challenges with specific processes related to reading fluency. In this session, we present research showing that RAN colors and objects can be understood as general processing speed tasks while RAN letters and numbers require both general processing and alphanumeric skills that are separable. These results suggest that RAN and processing speed tasks can be used strategically in reading assessments to better understand the nature of a child’s reading fluency challenges.


Lunch – Visit Exhibitors & Bookstore – 11:45 am to 12:35 pm


Friday Afternoon Breakout Sessions 1

(Choose 1 of 6) – 12:35 to 2:05 pm


Marilyn Zecher, M.A., CALT

Mathematical Literacy: No Fear Fractions, Instructional Language Holds the Key

Fraction concepts are foundational essentials for success in middle school and algebra, but they constitute one of the areas where intense confusions exist. Explicit instruction with simple manipulatives and precise language can tame the “fraction” problem. Learn why we no longer say, “Keep, Change, Flip” and why multiplying by the reciprocal actually works.


Lucy Hart Paulson, Ed.D., CCC-SLP, Early Literacy Specialist, Author and Consultant

“Teacher, How Do I Write…” Helping Young Students Develop Foundation Skills Needed for Becoming a Writer

A focus on teaching writing has not always had the same level of traction as reading in literacy instruction. A solid body of research supports the importance of intentionally teaching writing and guides evidence-based instruction. This session describes the writing process including developmental expectations, assessment strategies, and instruction techniques to help young children build foundation writing skills facilitating literacy learning.


Sue Grisko, M.S.Ed., Literacy Consultant, Readers All, Past President of the Illinois IDA Branch

Going on a Phoneme Hunt

Join us to delve into phoneme manipulation using sound chains.  Older struggling readers need advanced sound play to close their gap.  Learn about tracking those phonemes, practice group chaining using a tracking mat, and create chains using common spelling lists and words from reading materials.  Leave with a copy of the group tracking mat to use when back with your students. Wishing you success in your hunt for sound chains to use to help your kiddos!


Judi Dodson, M.A., Educational Consultant and Author, Bridges to Literacy

You Can’t Do Bloom’s Until You’ve Done Maslow: Building a Bridge to Social-Emotional Development and Academic Success

More children than ever are coming to school with significant vulnerabilities due to having experienced trauma. While Bloom’s Taxonomy leads teachers to move their students toward higher level thinking, Maslow’s Hierarchy guides teachers to think about what children need before they can actualize their potential and actually learn. As teachers of language and literacy, it is important that we understand the power of language to heal. A teacher’s language creates a climate and culture that can change a child’s life. It is language that can transform traditional instruction into “trauma informed” instruction. In this session we will discuss concrete ideas and tools to create an environment that supports our most vulnerable children, so they look forward to coming to school and feel safe and cared about when they get there.


Katie Chhu, M. Ed., Admissions Counselor at Landmark School

Study Skills: Strategies to Support Executive Function (Repeated on Saturday Morning)

Without strong study skills, students will struggle to develop academic proficiency and cannot reach their full potential.  Often vital skills like notetaking, long-term-planning, studying, etc. are not often explicitly taught. This presentation will explore practical instructional strategies to explicitly teach students to manage time, materials, and language to address executive function deficits and support their academic proficiency.


Experience Dyslexia® Simulation and Dyslexia 101

This hands-on simulation lets participants experience some of the challenges and frustrations faced by people with language-based learning differences. Participants will be guided through learning tasks commonly encountered in the classroom or workplace including reading comprehension, fluency, writing, spelling, listening and processing speed. This will be followed by a group discussion focusing on experiences shared and lessons learned as well as practical tips, accommodations and interventions for the classroom.


Break – Visit Exhibitors & Bookstore – 2:05 to 2:30 pm


Friday Afternoon Breakout Sessions 2

(Choose 1 of 6) – 2:30 to 4:00 pm


Cassie Guy, Ed.S. Elementary Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Coordinator, Greeley-Evans School District-6; Jessica Cooney, M.A., Secondary Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Coordinator, Greeley-Evans School District-6

Supporting Students Learning English in the General Education Classroom Through Academic Discourse and Academic Writing (Repeat of Friday Morning Session)

Participants will learn techniques to engage students learning English in academic discourse and academic writing while learning grade-level content in a general education setting. This session will provide strategies and scaffolds to help transfer structured academic discourse into academic writing for all grade levels. Through the use of structured academic discourse, academic writing becomes attainable.


Nannette Almon, M.Ed.; Twice-Exceptional District Coordinator, Cherry Creek School District

Now You See Me… Now You Don’t: The Many Faces of Twice Exceptionalities (2e) (Repeated on Saturday Afternoon)

Students who fall under the umbrella of twice exceptional (2e) are often misunderstood. Those who are gifted can use their strengths to compensate and in the process, mask a disability. Or, the disability can mask the giftedness. In some cases, neither the disability nor giftedness is recognized. In this session, participants will define 2e, learn how to create a comprehensive 2e evaluation plan, discover how to write both strength-based and access accommodations for 504 Plans and IEPs, understand programming needs, and gain access to additional resources in this field.


Diane Mayer, M.Ed., Fellow In Training/AOGPE, IDA-RMB Vice President; Nancy Blum, M.A.Ed and M.S.W., Literacy Specialist, IDA-RMB board member

The Path to Fluency: The Importance of Orthographic Mapping (Repeated on Saturday Afternoon)

This session, based on the work of David Kilpatrick, will address the critical roles that phonemic proficiency, letter/sound automaticity, and orthographic mapping play in the development of reading fluency. The session will highlight the importance of orthographic mapping in the process of learning how to store and rapidly retrieve words. Participants will come away with an understanding how words are stored for rapid retrieval, as well as strategies and activities they can take back to use with their students on Monday!


Janie Harvey, M.A.T., CALT, QI, Colorado Literacy and Learning Center; Laura Santerre-Lemmon, Ph.D., Director, Developmental Neuropsychology Clinic, University of Denver

Assessment Essentials: A Quick Guide to All those Numbers! (Repeated on Saturday Morning)

You’ve got the test results… now what? Join us as we explain the basics of testing for learning disabilities and commonly associated concerns. You’ll leave with a firmer grasp on test scores, percentiles, and how these numbers point to dyslexia, math and writing differences, ADHD, executive function deficits, and other challenges facing the children you support each day.


Anne Whitney, Ed.D., CCC-SLP, Spectrum Educational Consulting

Teaching the Trophy Kids: Basic Skills for Older Students

This session will discuss the typical oral language and literacy development of preadolescents and adolescents. The social impact of being raised in this generation, sometimes known as the Trophy Kids, will be interwoven with the normal development to discuss the kinds of educational approaches that best fit this population. The learner will experience hands on basic reading skill activities tailored to today’s Trophy Kids.


Karen Leopold, Fellow/AOGPE; IDA-RMB Treasurer; IDA Regional Representative for the Pacific Region

Multisensory Techniques and Mnemonics to Keep Your Lessons Effective and Fun
(Repeated on Saturday Morning)

What is multisensory instruction? How did it develop, and why is it a critical component of the Orton-Gillingham approach? Active, multisensory techniques for improving recall of decoding and encoding skills are demonstrated. The presenter shares innovative ideas—from using paper and pencil, to easily made games, and even iPad applications—to help teachers keep their lessons effective and engaging, the presenter will share innovative ideas, from using paper and pencil, to easily made games, and even iPad applications.


Friday Community Walk & Yoga

Looking for a way to wind down after the first day?
Want to meet and talk with other attendees?

Join us Friday, October 4th at 4:15 (right after the last session) for FREE Yoga in the hotel, or a walk around Vail Village. Hosted by our very own athletic Board Members, Tammy Curran and BJ McDonald. Don’t forget your yoga mat or walking shoes.

Sign Up at the IDA-RMB Info Table!



If you are only attending on Friday, don’t forget your one-day certificate at the end of the day!


CLICK HERE for Saturday’s Program


Thank you all for making this a wonderful 2019 conference!